Tag: Book Talk

2021 Author’s Discussion Series: Ricardo A. Wilson II

This event will be presented via Zoom teleconference. Please RSVP here to receive the Zoom link. The Nigrescent Beyond: Mexico, the United States, and the Psychic Vanishing of Blackness Despite New Spain’s significant participation in the early transatlantic slave trade, the collective imagination of the Mexican nation evolved in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to […]

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2021 Writer’s Discussion Series: Yomaira C. Figueroa-Vasquez

This event will be presented via Zoom teleconference. Please RSVP here to receive the Zoom link. Decolonizing Diasporas: Radical Mappings of Afro-Atlantic Literature Mapping literature from Spanish-speaking sub-Saharan African and Afro-Latinx Caribbean diasporas, Decolonizing Diasporas argues that the works of diasporic writers and artists from Equatorial Guinea, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba offer […]

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2021 Diaspora Lecture

  Joe W. Trotter, Jr. will deliver the 2021 Diaspora Lecture and discuss his latest publication Workers on Arrival: Black Labor and the Making of America. From the ongoing issues of poverty, health, housing and employment to the recent upsurge of lethal police-community relations, the Black working class stands at the center of perceptions of […]

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Book Talk: “The Meaning of Soul,” with Author Emily J. Lordi

Photo of Lordi and the cover of the book the Meaning of Soul

Join Emily J. Lordi, associate professor of English, and Michael Simanga, lecturer in the Department of African American Studies at Georgia State University, for a discussion of Lordi’s latest book, The Meaning of Soul, by Zoom. In The Meaning of Soul (Duke University Press, 2020), Lordi proposes a new understanding of this famously elusive concept. In the […]

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Virtual Book Talk: Monika Gosin

This event will be presented via Zoom teleconference. Please RSVP here to receive the Zoom link.   The Racial Politics of Division: Interethnic Struggles for Legitimacy in Multicultural Miami The Racial Politics of Division deconstructs antagonistic discourses that circulated in local Miami media between African Americans, “white” Cubans, and “black” Cubans during the 1980 Mariel […]

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2020 Author’s Discussion Series: Benjamin Talton

In This Land of Plenty: Mickey Leland and Africa in American Politics In This Land of Plenty presents Congressmen Mickey Leland as the embodiment of larger currents in African American politics at the end of the twentieth century. But a sober look at his aspirations shows the successes and shortcomings of domestic radicalism and aspirations […]

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2020 Author’s Discussion Series: Tiffany Lethabo King

The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies In The Black Shoals, Tiffany Lethabo King uses the shoal—an offshore geologic formation that is neither land nor sea—as metaphor, mode of critique, and methodology to theorize the encounter between Black studies and Native studies. King conceptualizes the shoal as a space where Black and […]

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2019 Writer’s Discussion Series: African Kings and Black Slaves: Sovereignty and Dispossession in the Early Modern Atlantic by Herman L. Bennett

In African Kings and Black Slaves, Herman L. Bennett mines the historical archives of Europe and Africa to reinterpret the first century of sustained African-European interaction. These encounters were not simple economic transactions. Rather, according to Bennett, they involved clashing understandings of diplomacy, sovereignty, and politics. In the eyes of Iberians, the extent to which Africa’s polities […]

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2019 Writer’s Discussion Series: Slavery and Class in the American South: A Generation of Slave Narrative Testimony, 1840-1865 by William L. Andrews

In William L. Andrews’s magisterial study of an entire generation of slave narrators, more than 60 mid-nineteenth-century narratives reveal how work, family, skills, and connections made for social and economic differences among the enslaved of the South. Slave narrators disclosed class-based reasons for violence that broke out between “impudent,” “gentleman,” and “lady” slaves and their […]

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2019 Writer’s Discussion Series: The Universal Ethiopian Students’ Association, 1927-1948: Mobilizing Diaspora by TaKeia Anthony

TaKeia N. Anthony offers the first study of the ideology, influences, and contributions of the Universal Ethiopian Students’ Association (UESA) and The African: The Journal of African Affairs. From 1927–1948, the UESA mobilized the African diaspora to fight against imperialism and fascist Italy. Formed by a group of educated Africans, African-Americans, and West Indians based in […]

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